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Student Awards

The Division is proud to recognize the accomplishments of its student members on work relevant to the field of gender and crime.

Our two major awards are:

The Larry J. Siegel Graduate Fellowship for the Study of Gender and Crime: This fellowship, given by the Darald and Julie Libby Foundation, is designed to recognize an exceptional graduate student in the field of gender and crime.  The division will annually give one graduate student a one-time award in the amount of $5,000 to support a project involving original research, program or service development, implementation, and/or evaluation, or advocacy.  To read more about this fellowship and view the criteria to apply, click HERE.

The Feminist Criminology Graduate Research Scholarship: This scholarship is designed to recognize an exceptional graduate student in the field of gender and crime. The Division will award one graduate student a one-time scholarship in the amount of US$5,000 to support a project involving original research. The scholarship is funded by the royalties from Feminist Criminology, an innovative journal that is dedicated to research related to women, girls, and crime within the context of a feminist critique of criminology. Published quarterly by SAGE Publications as the official journal of the Division on Women and Crime (DWC) of the American Society of Criminology, this international publication focuses on research and theory that highlights the gendered nature of crime.  To read more about this scholarship and view the criteria to apply, click HERE.

Clarification of Differences in Criteria for the Siegel Fellowship for the Study of Gender and Crime and the Feminist Criminology Graduate Research Scholarship:

Scholars may apply for both awards, but will not be able to win both. Please note the criteria for each award carefully. The Siegel Graduate Fellowship accommodates research along with program or service development, implementation, and/or evaluation, or advocacy, whereas the Feminist Criminology Graduate Research Scholarship accommodates research exclusively. The Siegel Graduate Fellowship is only for US applicants, whereas the Feminist Criminology Graduate Research Scholarship is for applicants based within and outside the USA. The Siegel Fellowship allows for US-based as well as cross-national research with the United States included in a comparative context. The Feminist Criminology Graduate Research Scholarship accommodates all forms of international research as well as US-based research.

We also offer the:

Graduate Scholar Award: recognizes the outstanding contributions of graduate students to the field women and crime, both in their published work and their service to the Division of Women & Crime. Outstanding contributions may include single or multiple published works that compliment the mission of the DWC, and significant work within the Division, including serving as committee members, committee chairs, or executive board members. Preference will be given to those candidates who have provided exceptional service to the DWC. Eligibility includes scholars who are still enrolled in an M.A. or Ph.D. program at the time of their nomination.

Student Paper Competition: The Division on Women and Crime of the American Society of Criminology invites submissions for the Student Paper Competition. The winners will be recognized during the DWC banquet at the annual conference and awarded cash prizes of $500.00 to the winner of the graduate competition and $250 to the winner of the undergraduate competition. In cases in which there are multiple authors, the award will be divided among the recipients.

Larry J. Siegel Graduate Fellowship for the Study of Gender and Crime 

2016: Erin Cournoyer (University of Massachusetts, Boston)
2015: Stephanie Bonnes (University of Colorado)
2014: Maddy Novich (Rutgers University)

Feminist Criminology Graduate Research Scholarship

2016: Annie Rose Crowley (University of Glasgow)
2015: Ntasha Bhardwaj (Rutgers University)

Graduate Scholar Award

2016: Katelyn A. Golladay
2015: Eryn O’Neal (Arizona State University)
2011: Tara Richards (University of South Florida)

Student Paper Award Recipients
Graduate:

2016: Bree Boppre (University of Nevada Las Vegas): “Mapping the Margins of Intersectional Criminology”

2015: Eryn O’Neal (Arizona State University): "Victim Cooperation in Intimate Partner Sexual Assault Cases: A Mixed Methods Examination” and Megan Walsh (San Diego State University): “Confronting the Limits of Caring and the Burdens of Control Amidst Carceral Realignment: Formerly-Incarcerated Women’s Self-Governance Work”

2014: Jaclyn Cwick (University of Missouri, St. Louis): "Revisiting Coercive Mobility: Women’s Social Capital and Neighborhood Social Control."

2013: Yi Ting Chua (Michigan State University): "The Role of Gender and Risk Perception among Police Officers: General Lifestyle Risks and Occupation-Specific Risks."

2012: Kristin Bell (Northeastern University): ‘”Seeing” Genocide: Constructing a Gendered Counter-memory of the Armenian Case.’

2011: Andrea Nicholas (University of St. Louis): “Feminist Advocacy in Community Based Responses to Domestic Violence: An Examination of Feminist Identities, Ideologies and Practices.”

2009: Jennifer McMahon-Howard (University of Georgia): A Longitudinal Examination of the Adoption of Multiple Rape Law Reforms

2007: Tina Freiburger: "The Effects of Gender, Family Status, and Race on Sentencing Decisions"

2007 Honorable Mention: Caroline Akers: The Police Reporting Decisions of Intimate Partner Violence Victims: Race, Marital Status, and Children Considered.

2005: Jennifer J. McMahon (University of Georgia): "Marital Rape Laws, 1976-2002: From Exemptions to Prohibitions"

2005 Honorable Mention: Don Kurtz (Kansas State University): "Controlled Burn: The Gendering of Stress, Burnout, and Violence in Modern Policing"

2004: Callie Harbin Burt: "Not Just Rogue Males: Gender Identity in General Strain Theory"

2003: Sara Goodkind and Diane Lynn Miller: "A Widening of the Net of Social Control? 'Gender Specific' Treatment for Young Women in the U.S. Juvenile Justice System"

2002: Kristin Carbone: "The Usual Suspects: How Race Affects Decisions to Report Victimization"

2002 Honorable Mention: Amanda Burgess-Proctor (Michigan State University): "Evaluating the Efficacy of Protection Orders for Victims of Domestic Violence"

1999: Emily Gaarder: "A Feminist Version of Justice? The Problems & Possibilities of Restorative Justice"

1998: Angie Moe: "Battered Women in the Restraining Order Process: Observations on a Court Advocacy Program"

Undergraduate:

2016: Jennifer Herrerra (University of California Davis): “Street Harassment: An Examination of Interpretations”

2015: Megan Smith (University of Maryland): “Preparing for Release: Women's Perceptions on Reentry Workshops"

2014: Erin Hoffman (Southern Connecticut State University): "Predicting Rates of Sexual Violence using State-­‐Level Risk Factors."

2013: Georgia Valentine (Occidental College): "Challenges Formerly Incarcerated Women Face: How a Reentry Program Can Offer Support."

2012: Christine Galvin-White (Arizona State University): "Lesbian Police Officers: Personal Attributes, Interpersonal Working Relationships and Organizational Discrimination."

2011: LarQuette Smith (Michigan State University): “Do Racial Pathways Exist? A Look at the Juvenile Justice System through the Lens of Female Delinquents.”

2010: Amanda Petersen (Portland State University): "The Criminalization of Female Welfare Recipients: A Marxist Feminist Perspective."

2009: Andrea Doyle (Oregon State University): "Delinquent Girls: In Need of a Feminist Education for Rehabilitative Programming"

2007: Rebecca DeAngelis: "Differences in Symptomatological Manifestations of Sociopathy Based on Sex"

2005: Desiree D. Adams (University of Alabama): "The Filicidal Body"